Celebrate the Celtic Mabon (Autumn Equinox) Festival on Sept 21

September 16, 2020

Celebrate the Celtic Mabon (Autumn Equinox) Festival on Sept 21

With the change of the seasons from the haze of summer to the cool of fall, comes the Celtic autumn equinox festival, called Mabon. It’s part of the annual sacred Celtic celebrations, which date back to ancient times. Whether you’re looking to celebrate the Mabon autumn equinox festival, or commemorate any other timely celebration, we here at Walker Metalsmiths have a fine selection of handcrafted Celtic jewelry for you, to mark any occasion.

Autumn Equinox Festival

The Celtic autumn equinox festival is on September 21st, marking the day when

handcrafted Celtic jewelry pieces

the sun is almost directly over the equator, creating an equal amount of day and night. In the Celtic tradition, this holiday goes by the name Mabon, after the name of the God of Welsh mythology. However, while autumnal equinox festivals have been celebrated since ancient Celtic times, it is believed that the name Mabon itself is a more modern development, as the name only started appearing in earnest in the 1970s.

Mabon also is known as the Second Harvest Festival, and falls between the first harvest festival, called Lughnasadh, and the last harvest festival, Samhain. Versions of Mabon have been celebrated around the world for centuries by various different cultures, including the Greeks, Bavarians, Native Americans, and Chinese.

In Celtic tradition, Mabon typically commemorates the celebration of resting after a long and laborious harvest season. It is traditionally seen as a time to finish projects and clear out emotional and physical clutter, so that the winter can be a restful and peaceful season.

Mabon is symbolized with the cornucopia, signifying a wealthy and bountiful harvest. If you’re looking to celebrate Mabon, you can have a feast with friends and loved ones, plant flower bulbs which will pop up in the springtime or clear out clutter in preparation for winter.

Handcrafted Celtic Jewelry

Here at Walker Metalsmiths, we draw on ancient Celtic traditions to create

custom made Celtic jewelry

our custom handcrafted Celtic jewelry. For example, our pieces featuring a handcrafted Celtic cross draw on complex and rich symbolism. In fact, the Walker family has spent a great deal of time extensively studying the Celtic cross and its history, so we can best represent these traditions in our Celtic jewelry. Other Celtic symbols we study and incorporate into our work include the Claddagh symbol and zoomorphic imagery.

We use our craft to create handcrafted Celtic necklaces, rings, earrings, and much more. We’re also happy to use your old gold or gemstones, to help you recreate the custom piece of your dreams.

 

Open for In-Person Showings

While you can view our diverse selection of handcrafted Celtic jewelry online, we are pleased to now be offering in-person viewings. Since the health and safety of our guests and staff is our top priority, we are seeing guests by appointment-only. If you are near our Andover, New York showroom, making an appointment is a great way to meet the Walker family of jewelers, and view our selection of jewelry in a personal environment. We are happy to guide you through the process, help recommend selections for you, and ensure you find the perfect piece.



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