Happy New Year’s Sounds Much Better Than Happy Day of the Buttered Bread

December 28, 2020

Happy New Year’s Sounds Much Better Than Happy Day of the Buttered Bread

It’s actually an old Celtic custom to celebrate the new year with a slice of a freshly buttered roll. There are several different interpretations on the direct translation, but New Year’s Day is commonly referred to as either La na gCeapairi.“The Day of Buttered Bread,” or “the day of the bread with butter upon it.”

Historians believed these traditions began in Ireland during a time when families

celebrating Celtic New Years

relied heavily on farming and agriculture. If there was a successful crop, then families could survive for a full year, especially if they can sell or barter with the surplus. However, poor crops meant hunger, which was often fatal. The day of Buttered Bread was a ceremony to protect families from hunger in the same way celtic jewelry is also used to protect against hunger and evil.

How is New Year’s Celebrated in Ireland?

When the day of buttered bread first became popular in the 19th century, the Irish celebrated it a little different than today.

Families would gather and share a loaf of bread and butter after reciting a prayer. Neighbors used to travel from house to house trading slices of fresh bread and sweet butter. They would also display slices of bread in their front window for passers-by to stop by. If they didn’t get the hint, they would even throw a loaf of bread out the door so that visitors could bring it back inside with them when they entered.Sometimes families even left sandwiches outside of their door at night for any wandering fairies.

Happy Buttered Bread Day!

There are always timeless elements of every tradition. New Year’s still encourages people to reflect and wish each other good luck for the new year.

custom celtic jewelry

While we may not be sharing slices of toast with our neighbors, we’re sure we can all still find ways to connect with each other. Now is the perfect time of year to surprise someone with someone that shows you care, like a gorgeous hand-crafted Celtic cross.

Consider sharing a special piece like a Walker Metalsmith's custom made Celtic necklace with a loved one that also symbolizes good luck and prosperity in the new year. If you need help figuring out where to get started, we’re here to help! You can still call and schedule an appointment to come into the showroom, try on each piece, and get our recommendations on something that truly says, “Happy Buttered Bread Day.”



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